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Archive for the ‘Mohammed cartoons’ Category

My Drawing of Mohammed

Posted by Dan Draney on June 6, 2010

Mohammed's X-wing

Mohammed in his X-Wing

PLaplace’s post on the results of the Reason magazine “Everybody Draw Mohammed Day” competition reminds me that I never submitted a drawing of my own on the subject. Due to my extreme lack of artistic talent, I’ll submit one I made on my computer.

So here you have Mohammed, May the Force Be with Him, in his X-Wing fighter. It’s a little hard to spot him there in the cockpit, so you’ll have to take my word for it that he’s inside. True Star Wars aficionados may wonder why he’s in an X-Wing rather than a TIE fighter. We can only surmise that he captured the X-Wing and is escaping from the rebels.

Posted in Islam, jokes, Mohammed cartoons | Tagged: , | 2 Comments »

A Look Back at Everyone Draw Mohammad Day

Posted by PLaplace on June 6, 2010

Though the official “Everyone Draw Mohammad Day” passed by several weeks ago largely unnoticed, I thought I would draw some attention to reason magazine’s celebration of the day.  Around the time the contest was first making the rounds, the editors at reason announced that they would hold a contest for best EDM Day picture, and post the winner on their website.  The entries were numerous, and I must admit that though the runners up were all fantastic in their own way, the winner truly took the cake and fit the spirit of the event perfectly.  If you have not seen it, I highly recommend you take a minute and check it out.  The winner is at the bottom of the page:  And the Winner of the Everybody Draw Mohammad Contest is…

Bonus link:  reason also published an article entitled “Defending the Project of Free Inquiry,” defending their decision to celebrate EDM Day in the first place and rebutting the argument that EDM Day is counter productive because it also insults moderate Muslims.  A fantastic read as well.

Posted in Islam, Mohammed cartoons | 1 Comment »

The Danish Cartoons

Posted by Dan Draney on April 25, 2010

danish011

The most widely known cartoon of the series

The “controversial” Danish cartoons depicting Mohammed were published in Sept., 2005, leading to riots and murders perpetrated by Muslims in 2006, and death threats that persist today against the cartoonists involved. As I wrote in DLMSY at the time:

Thousands of Muslims around the world got all worked up about 12 cartoons published back in September in a Danish newspaper, Jyllands-Posten. Outraged that some of the cartoons dared to suggest that Islam is a violent religion, many of the “faithful” have poured into the streets threatening to kill those who would utter such a slander. Others went right to the killings of random Westerners, the burning of any buildings associated with Denmark, and so on, all in the name of the Religion of Peace. Some slightly less nutty groups began a boycott of Danish goods. Gee, a person might get the wrong impression about Islam from the way its adherents overreact to such small things. Well, it’s not the “wrong” impression, we guess, but a bad one anyway.

Despite (or more accurately because of) the controversy many people have never seen the actual cartoons that sparked it. American mainstream media generally declined to broadcast or print the cartoons, as the riots were occurring or afterwards. A recent book from Yale University Press devoted to the topic did not even show the cartoons it was discussing. These acts of self-censorship were generally dressed up as nods to “sensibilities” of Muslims, but the root cause was obviously fear. The cartoon with Mohammed’s turban as a bomb is probably the image, if any, that most people saw and remember. I can understand why Muslims would find this offensive. Do Muslims understand that murder, rioting and terrorism in the name of Islam is not just offensive, but evil and bad for Islam? Those behaviors have done far more to hurt Islam’s reputation than a million cartoons could.

Today free speech continues to lose ground even here in America where it is deeply rooted in our culture. If we keep taking the “safe,” easy way of self-censorship we let the most violent elements of Islamic Fascism define what is acceptable discourse. If we do that we have de facto Sharia law. In the name of standing up for freedom of expressiont, here are the rest of the Danish cartoons, along with something else that stains Islam. See if you can pick that one out.

danish1

Not much to be offended about with this one.

danish002

Note the Islamic crescent as horns.

danish006

More of a caricature of the cartoonists.

danish008

Apparently a police lineup w/ Danish polticians dressed as Mohammed.

danish012

Caricature of cartoonists: PR Stunt to the Head

danish007

The best of the 12. The cartoonist is in the process of penning a perfectly harmless drawing of Mohammed. He's in a dark room, sweating profusely, hiding the drawing with one hand, and glancing furtively over his shoulder in fear. That gets right to the heart of the matter, with subtlety, sharpness and humor.

danish004

Combining opression of women and violence

danish003

Not much to be offended about with this one.

danish010

Actual caption: "Relax folks, after all it's just a drawing made by an infidel from south Denmark..."

danish005

I don't care who you are. That's funny.

Which dishonors Mohammed more: cartoons or this?

danish009

Click to see translation of the Danish poem.

Posted in Islam, Mohammed cartoons, terrorism | 2 Comments »

South Park and Self-Censorship

Posted by Dan Draney on April 25, 2010

DIrka dirka. Mohammed jihad.

You may have missed it, but this week Comedy Central censored an episode of South Park. As you can probably guess, this was not done in response to agitation by a Christian, Jewish, Hindu, Zoroastrian, or even atheist group. It was done in response to death threats against the creators of South Park by a member of what we refer to as The Religion of Peace. Despite all the talk on the left about Christians representing some budding theocratic threat, there is only one religion, Islam, that issues death threats at the drop of a cartoon.

This particular episode satirized Islam’s kooky (and rather selective, in that it only applies to infidels) outrage at any depiction of Mohammad, and it featured a cartoon Mohammad in a bear suit.

Meanwhile our national media never seem to miss a chance to miss a chance to defend free speech against those who threaten violence against those who jeopardize their free speech rights by exercising them. As Diana West writes:

No other American “name” I can think of, no one tops in pop culture, has spoken out against (or even mentioned) the Islamic threat to Western freedom of expression as exemplified by the Sharia dictates against “Motooning.” Certainly no one has produced creative content about it.

Rather, such dictates have been religiously followed — no pun whatsoever intended — just as though our society were itself officially Islamic. This makes “South Park’s” message the closest thing yet to a mainstream declaration of independence from Sharia. For rejecting both the threat of violence and the emotional blackmail emanating from Islam over critiquing Islam’s prophet, the two “South Park” creators deserve a medal.

“They’re courageous — no doubt that they are,” said Bill O’Reilly of Fox’s “O’Reilly Factor” this week. He was discussing the Islamic death threats against Parker and Stone that, naturally, followed the recent “South Park” Muhammad episode.

The threats came in a jihadist video (caption: “Help Us Remove the Filth”) portraying the writer-producers as likely victims of Islamic violence along with Ayaan Hirsi Ali, Salman Rushdie, Geert Wilders, Kurt Westergaard and Lars Vilks. A photo of the slain body of filmmaker Theo van Gogh, his head nearly cut off on an Amsterdam, Netherlands, street in 2004 by a jihadist assassin, served as an example.

Rather than praise Parker’s and Stone’s courage, however, O’Reilly went on to disparage their judgment.

“Was it the smart thing to do in light of the Danish cartoonist and van Gogh?” he asked. “It’s harmless to me,” he continued about the episode in question. “But if you are a hard-core jihadist, any mention of Muhammad in any kind of way, particularly if you’re poking fun at him, is a capital offense.”

Way to “look out for the folks,” Bill. Jon Stewart to his great credit, had an extensive piece about the incident on The Daily Show, ending with a “gospel chorus” singing, “Go f*ck yourself.”

Dan Savage has suggested a perfect response we all can participate in: an Everybody Draw Mohammed Day festival.

When the original Mohammad Cartoon Controversy erupted, it played out in the US with most people never even seeing the cartoons involved. Since one can’t discuss the controversy intelligently without actually seeing the cartoons, I put them on Flickr and linked to them from DLMSY. The Flickr interface is a bit clunky, so I will reproduce them here in the next post.

Posted in Islam, Mohammed cartoons, terrorism | 1 Comment »

Victory for Freedom of Speech in France

Posted by Dan Draney on March 23, 2007

It’s strange from an American perspective, but in France you can be sued, fined, and even imprisoned for offending people. In the thick of the Mohammed Cartoon controversy whipped up by some Danish imams on a tour of the Middle East, the French, satirical newspaper, Charlie Hebdo took a stand for free speech. They republished the cartoons and added another caricature of their own.

Some French Islamist groups sued, and the case was just decided today in favor of free speech. Paper cleared in Muhammad drawings case – Yahoo! News:

PARIS – A French court cleared a satirical weekly newspaper Thursday in a case brought by Muslims who were angered by its publication of caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad.

The newspaper Charlie-Hebdo and its director, Philippe Val, were accused of “publicly abusing a group of people because of their religion.” Val had risked a six-month prison sentence and a fine of up to $29,250.

The court ruled that Charlie-Hebdo showed no intention of insulting the Muslim community with the caricatures, several of which appeared first in a Danish paper and sparked angry protests across the Muslim world and in Europe.

It was good to see that all three of the leading presidential candidates issued statements of support for Charlie Hebdo before the trial. Notably, Nicholas Sarkozy, who has himself been ruthlessly satirized by the paper, led the way in supporting them in this case.

All 12 of the original caricatures can be viewed here. They are, for the most part, pretty tame fare. For some of them it is a bit hard to understand the joke, but a Danish commenter on our Flikr album has helped explain those.

Posted in Charlie Hebdo, Mohammed cartoons | Leave a Comment »

 
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